100 Grain vs. 150 Grain Broadheads

In a recent blog post, we ran the calculations for kinetic energy and momemtum when you use a 150-grain broadhead, like the Wasp SharpShooter Traditional. On paper, it showed a slight decrease in kinetic energy and an increase in momentum, which should increase penetration. But we wanted to test this theory at the range, so recently we shot a video using both the 100-grain and 150-grain SharpShooter. You can see the result in the video below.

This time, I was shooting a Mathews Z7 Extreme set at 62 pounds of draw weight. I used the same arrow, the same pin on my sight and shot from the same distance at a brand new target faced with a piece of plywood. The only thing that changed was the weight of the broadhead. Even the design of the broadhead stayed the same since the SharpShooter Traditional gains its additional weight from a stainless steel ferrule instead of an alumninum ferrule that’s on the original SharpShooter.

Below is what the calculator on realtree.com put our kinetic energy output at.

100 Grain Broadhead:

150 Grain Broadhead:

By adding a heavier broadhead, I lost 1.38 (2.1%) foot-pounds of kinetic energy and gained .0022 (4.3%) slugs of momentum.

Here’s what that looks like at the range:

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The SharpShooter Traditional was made for bowhunters using recurves. As Tony Hansen of Antler Geeks points out:

“Most broadheads come in 100-grain configurations. And that’s fine. But what if you’re looking to maximize your KE and momentum? Traditional archers understand this philosophy better than most. They aren’t going to tweak more speed out of their bows. So they opt for heavy arrows and cut-on-contact heads to maximize penetration.”

The Drone has been my go-to broadhead for whitetail lately, but if I decide to hunt bigger-boned game, like a elk (I hope to make a trip out West soon) or Moose, you can bet a SharpShooter Tradional will be on the end of my arrow.